Pachycereus militaris Audot d r Hunt 1987

golden fleece, military cap, teddy-bear cactus Cereus militaris Audot 1845, Mitrocereus militaris (Audot) Buxbaum 1961, Backebergia militaris (Audot) Sánchez-Mejorada 1973, Ceph-alocereus militaris (Audot) H. E. Moore 1975 Pilocereus chrysomallus Lemaire 1847, Cereus chrysomallus (Lemaire) Hemsley 1880, Cephalocereus chrysomallus (Lemaire) K. Schumann 1894, Pachycereus chrysomallus (Lemaire) Britton & Rose 1909, Backebergia chrysomallus (Lemaire) Bravo 1953

Plants treelike, columnar, solitary at first, later branching and forming an almost solid mass 12-18 m (39-59 ft) high, to 5 m (16 ft) in diameter. Stems erect, glaucous green. Ribs 11-14 with areoles close together and bearing short wool and white woolly hairs. Central spines 3-4, erect, yellowish to brownish, one can be more than 10 cm (3.9 in) long. Radial spines 10-12, flexible, bristly, 1.5-4 cm (0.6-1.6 in) long. Pseudocephalia to 30 cm (12 in) long and 20 cm (7.9 in) in diameter, forming huge caps of yellowish brown wool on the stem tips. Flowers arising from the sides of the pseudocephalium, open at night, reddish to cream, 5 cm (2 in) long, 3.5-4 cm

(1.4-1.6 in) in diameter; pericarpels and floral tubes covered with small scales, tufts of wool, and bristles. Fruits oblong, fleshy, becoming dry at maturity, with scales, bristles, and long tufts of woolly hairs. Distribution: Guerrero, Michoa-cán, and Colima, Mexico. A greatly confused nomenclatural history exists for Pachycereus militaris, but it has been clarified by Sánchez-Mejorada (1973). Pachycereus militaris is listed in Appendix I of cites.

Pachycereus pecten-aboriginum (Engelmann) Britton & Rose 1909

ABORIGINE'S COMB, CHIK, ETCHO, HAIRBRUSH CACTUS, HECHO, INDIAN'S COMB

Cereus pecten-aboriginum Engelmann 1886 Pachycereus tehuantepecanusT. MacDougall & Bravo 1956, P. pecten-aboriginum subsp. tehuantepecanus (T. MacDougall & Bravo) P. V. Heath 1992

Plants treelike, columnar, branching freely, to 8 m (26 ft) high with well-defined trunks to 2 m (6.6 ft) high. Stems deep green, erect, fluted, relatively short, 9-13 cm (3.5-5.1 in) in diameter. Ribs 10-12, somewhat rounded. Central spines 1-3, grayish with darker tips, 1-3 cm (0.4-1.2 in) long. Radial spines 8-9, grayish, to 1 cm (0.4 in) long. Pseudocephalia on the tips of older stems, covered with reddish brown wool and bristles to 6 cm (2.4 in) long. Flowers open during the day, white, 7-9 cm (2.8-3.5 in) long; pericarpels and floral tubes heavily covered with soft reddish brown hairs but few or no bristles. Fruits dry, 6-7.5 cm (2.4-3 in) in diameter, completely covered with yellow wool and bristles. Distribution: occurring widely in Mexico, from the Pacific coast of the Baja

Pachycereus Militaris

Pachycereus militaris

Pachycereus Militaris

Pachycereus lepidanlhus

Pachycereus marginal us, also illustrated on page 68

Pachycereus lepidanlhus

Pachycereus marginal us, also illustrated on page 68

Pachycereus militaris

Pachycereus Militaris
Pachycereus pecten-aboriginum, photograph by George Lindsay

Pachycereus pringlei, also illustrated on page 16; fruits illustrated on page 55

Pachycereus schottii, also illustrated on page 31

Pachycereus schottii, also illustrated on page 31

Pachycereus Militaris

Pachycereus pringlei, also illustrated on page 16; fruits illustrated on page 55

Pachycereus Pringlei Fruit

California Peninsula, Sinaloa, and Sonora east to the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, Oaxaca. The ethnobotanical use of Pachycereus pecten-aboriginum is discussed in Chapter 2, under Cacti as Medicine, and Other Uses of Cacti (hairbrushes).

Pachycereus pringlei (S.Watson) Britton &Rose 1909

cardon, cardon gigante, cardon pelon, sagueso, sahuaso Cereus pringlei S. Watson 1885, Pilocereus pringlei (S. Watson) F. A. C.

Weber 1898 Pachycereus calvus Britton & Rose 1909

Plants treelike, columnar, branched, to 11 m (36 ft) high with well-formed trunks to 60 cm (24 in) in diameter. Stems erect, strongly fluted, blue-green to dark green, becoming yellow-green, 20-30 cm (7.9-12 in) in diameter. Ribs 10-16, obtuse. Central spines 1-3, grayish white with darker tips, to 3 cm (1.2 in) long. Radial spines 7-10, whitish to grayish, to 2 cm (0.8 in) long. Flowering areoles large, terminal, covered with brown felt, connected by furrows or confluent. Flowers open both at night and during the day, funnelform to bell shaped, white, to 8 cm (3.1 in) long; pericarpels and floral tubes bearing small scales with masses of brown hairs arising from their axils. Fruits globose, somewhat dry at maturity, to 7 cm (2.8 in) long, covered with yellowish brown felt and bristles. Distribution: Sonoran Desert of Sonora, Baja California, and Baja California Sur, Mexico. Fruits of Pachycereus pringlei are harvested by the Seri, stems are used medicinally, and containers have been fashioned from portions of stems that react to woodpecker holes (Chapter 2, under Cacti as Food, Cacti as Medicine, and Other Uses of Cacti).

Pachycereus schottii (Engelmann) D. R. Hunt 1987

cina, whisker cactus, garambuyo, mochi, senita, sina, sinita, totem cactus (a cultivated monstrose form), tuna barbona, viejo

Cereus schottii Engelmann 1856, Pilocereus schottii (Engelmann) Lemaire 1862, Lophocereus schottii (Engelmann) Britton & Rose 1909

Cereus sargentianus Orcutt 1891, Pilocereus sargentianus (Orcutt) K. Schumann 1892, Lophocereus sargentianus (Orcutt) Britton & Rose 1909

Cereus schottii var. australis K. Brandegee 1900, Pilocereus schottii var. australis (K. Brandegee) K. Schumann 1903, Lophocereus australis Britton & Rose 1909, L schottii var. australis (K. Brandegee) Borg 1937

Cereus mieckleyanus Weingart 1931, Lemaireocereus mieckleyanus (Weingart) Borg 1951, Lophocereus mieckleyanus (Weingart) Backeberg 1960 Lophocereus schottii var. tenuis G. E. Lindsay 1963

Plants treelike to shrubby, often forming thickets of more than 100 stems, rarely with trunks. Stems more or less erect,

Pachycereus weberi 537

1-3 m (3.3-9.8 ft) high, yellow-green, 5-10 cm (2-3.9 in) in diameter. Ribs 4-13, prominent. Central spines 1-3, stout, gray, 1-3 cm (0.4-1.2 in) long. Radial spines 3-15, gray, 0.51.5 cm (0.2-0.6 in) long. Pseudocephalia terminal, 5 cm (2 in) to sometimes 1 m (3.3 ft) or more in length, forming long brushlike masses of flexible gray spines. Flowers borne laterally on the pseudocephalium, open at night, funnelform, white to deep pink, to 4 cm (1.6 in) long, 3 cm (1.2 in) in diameter; pericarpels and floral tubes with scales and hairs. Fruits globose, red with red pulp, fleshy, 1-3 cm (0.4-1.2 in) in diameter. Distribution: southern Arizona, and Baja Cali fornia and Sonora , Mexico. Several varieties have been described for what is now Pachycereus schottii, none recom-bined in Pachycereus and it is doubtful that they warrant recognition. Fruits of P. schottii are tasty though they are not harvested as a crop (Chapter 2, under Cacti as Food).

Pachycereus weberi (J. M. Coulter) Backeberg 1960

CANDELABRO, CARDON, CHICO

Cereus weberi J. M. Coulter 1896, Lemaireocereus weberi (J. M. Coulter) Britton & Rose 1909, Ritterocereus weberi (J. M. Coulter) Backeberg 1951, Stenocereus weberi (J. M. Coulter) Buxbaum 1961

Lemaireocerus Weberi Candelabra

538 Pachycereus wefaeri

Pachycereusgrandis var. gigas Backeberg 1941, P. gigas (Backeberg) Backeberg 1960

Plants treelike, massive, columnar to candelabra-like, to 11 m (36 ft) high, much branched from large trunks to 2 m (6.6 ft) high. Stems erect, blue-green, to 12 cm (4.7 in) or more in diameter. Ribs 8-10, rounded. Central spine one, flattened, blackish, to 10 cm (3.9 in) long. Radial spines 6-12, reddish brown to black, 2-3 cm (0.8-1.2 in) long. No pseudocephal-ium evident. Flowers borne laterally on the stems, open at night, yellowish white, to 10 cm (3.9 in) long; pericarpels and floral tubes with small scales and bearing long yellowish brown hairs from their axils. Fruits oblong, dehiscing often into four segments, pulp reddish purple, edible, 6-7 cm (2.4-2.8 in) long, with abundant yellowish spines. Distribution: Puebla, Oaxaca, and Guerrero, Mexico.

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