Echinopsis saltensis Spegazzini 1905

Lobivia saltensis (Spegazzini) Britton & Rose 1922

Echinopsis cachensis Spegazzini 1905, Lobivia cachensis (Spegazzini)

Britton & Rose 1922 Lobivia nealeana Backeberg 1934, Hymenorebutia nealeana (Backeberg) Buining 1939, Echinopsis nealeana (Backeberg) H. Friedrich 1974, E. saltensis vat. nealeana (Backeberg) J. G. Lambert 1998 Lobivia pseudocachensis Backeberg 1934, Hymenorebutia pseudo-cachensls (Backeberg) Buining 1939, Echinopsis pseudocachensis (Backeberg) H. Friedrich 1974, E. saltensis vat. pseudocachensis (Backeberg) J. G. Lambert 1998 Lobivia emmae Backeberg 1948

Plants usually solitary, only occasionally forming clusters. Taproots large. Stems globose to short cylindrical, light

Echinopsis saltensis

green, to 9 cm (3.5 in) in diameter. Ribs 17-18, low, with shallow tubercles. Central spines 1-4, straight, stout, 1-1.2 cm (0.4-0.5 in) long. Radial spines 12-14, thinner than centrals, to 0.6 cm (0.2 in) long. Flowers borne laterally, open during the day, funnelform, red with darker throats, to 4 cm (1.6 in) long. Fruits small, dehiscent. Distribution: between Tucumán and Salta, northern Argentina.

Echinopsis sanguiniflora (Backeberg) D. R. Hunt 1991

Lobivia sanguiniflora Backeberg 1935

Lobivia breviflora Backeberg 1935

Lobivia duursmaiana Backeberg 1935

Lobivia polycephala Backeberg 1935

Plants usually solitary, flattened globose to globose, light to dark green, to 10 cm (3.9 in) high and in diameter. Taproots thick. Ribs 18, spiraling, obliquely notched. Spines dark at first, sometimes reddish below, becoming gray with age. Central spines several, often forming a cross, hooked or strongly curved, at least one to 8 cm (3.1 in) long. Radial spines about 10, flattened against the stem surface or radiating, 0.8-1.5 cm (0.3-0.6 in) long. Flowers blood-red, often with whitish throats, to 5 cm (2 in) long. Distribution: near the Bolivian border, northern Argentina.

Echinopsis santaensis (Rauh & Backeberg) H. Friedrich &

G. D. Rowley 1974 Trichocereus santaensis Rauh & Backeberg 1956

Plants shrubby, branching basally with several erect stems, to 5 m (16 ft) high. Stems cylindrical, gray-green, lightly frosted, to 15 cm (5.9 in) in diameter. Ribs 7, broad, flat, notched over areoles. Spines brownish. Central spine one, to 4 cm (1.6 in) long. Radial spines 2-3,2-3 cm (0.8-1.2 in) long. Distribution: valley of the Rio Santa, central Peru. Echinopsis santaensis is poorly known.

Echinopsis schickendantzii F. A. c. Weber 1896 Trichocereus schickendantzii (F. A. C. Weber) Britton & Rose 1920 Trichocereus shaferl Britton & Rose 1920, not Echinopsis shaferl Britton & Rose 1922 (see E. leucantha) Trichocereus manguinii Backeberg 1953, Echinopsis manguinii

(Backeberg) H. Friedrich & G. D. Rowley 1974 Trichocereus volcanensis F. Ritter 1980

Plants shrubby, sometimes solitary, usually branching basally to form clumps. Stems slender cylindrical to oblong, shiny light green, 15-25 cm (5.9-9.8 in) long, to 6 cm (2.4 in) in diameter. Ribs 14-18, low, somewhat acute, notched. Areoles very close set, sometimes touching. Spines yellowish, flexible, to 1 cm (0.4 in) long. Central spines 4, sometimes more with

Echinopsis schieliana 279

age. Radial spines 9. Flowers borne at the stem tips, tubular to funnelform, white, not scented, 20-22 cm (7.9-8.7 in) long; floral tubes with dense black hairs. Fruits edible. Distribution: near Tucuman, northwestern Argentina.

Echinopsis schieliana (Backeberg) D. R. Hunt 1987 Lobivia schieliana Backeberg 1957, L. backebergii subsp. schieliana

(Backeberg) G. D. Rowley 1982 Lobivia quiabayensls Rausch 1968, Echinopsis maximiliana subsp.

quiabayensis (Rausch) G. D. Rowley 1982 Lobivia leptacantha Rausch 1972

Plants often forming clusters from basal branching. Stems globose to cylindrical, often slender, to 4.5 cm (1.8 in) long and 3.5 cm (1.4 in) in diameter. Ribs about 14. Central spine one, often absent at first, bent downward, light brown, 5-6 mm (0.2 in) long. Radial spines about 14, pectinate to radiating, interlacing, light brown. Flowers bright light red; floral tubes slender. Distribution: Peru and Bolivia.

Lobivia Large Central Spine
Echinopsis schickendantzii

280 Echinopsis schoenii

Echinopsis schoenii (Rauh & Backeberg) H. Friedrich & G. D.

Rowley 1974 Trichocereus schoenii Rauh & Backeberg 1958

Plants shrubby, branching irregularly basally, 3-4 m (9.8-13 ft) high. Stems cylindrical, gray-green, 10-15 cm (3.9-5.9 in) in diameter. Ribs 7, broad, notched. Areoles yellowish gray, 1-2 cm (0.4-0.8 in) apart. Spines brownish at first, later gray with brown tips. Central spines 1-2, erect or pointing downward, stout, to 7 cm (2.8 in) long. Radial spines 6-8, very unequal, upper ones to 1.5 cm (0.6 in) long, lower ones to 5 cm (2 in) long. Flowers white, to 16 cm (6.3 in) long; floral tubes with blackish brown hairs. Distribution: valley of the Rio Majes, southern Peru.

Echinopsis schrieteri (A. Castellanos) Werdermann 1931 Lobivia schreiten A. Castellanos 1930

Lobivia stilowiana Backeberg 1949, Echinopsis stilowiana (Backeberg) J. G. Lambert 1998

Plants forming dense clusters or mats to 30 cm (12 in) wide with numerous stems. Taproots large. Stems globose to elongate, 1.5-3 cm (0.6-1.2 in) in diameter. Ribs 9-14. Central spine usually absent, sometimes one to 2 cm (0.8 in) long. Radial spines 6-8, fine, curving, whitish, 0.5-1 cm (0.2-0.4 in) long. Flowers funnelform, purplish red with darker throats, to 3 cm (1.2 in) long and in diameter. Distribution: Tucumän, Argentina.

Echinopsis scopulicola (F. Ritter) Mottram 1997 Trichocereus scopulicola F. Ritter 1966

Plants shrubby, branching basally with several erect columnar stems, 3-4 m (9.8-13 ft) high. Stems cylindrical, 8-10 cm (3.1-3.9 in) in diameter. Ribs 4-6, large, tuberculate, obtuse. Areoles white, round to oval, 1.5-3 cm (0.6-1.2 in) apart. Spines usually absent, sometimes 3-4, awl shaped, brown, to 1 mm long. Flowers borne near the stem tips, fragrant, white, 16-20 cm (6.3-7.9 in) long. Fruits green, 4-5 cm (1.6-2 in) long. Distribution: O'Connor province, Tarija, Bolivia.

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