Echinocereus laui G Frank 1978

Plants branching basally to form clumps of as many as 20 heads with spines obscuring the stems. Stems cylindrical, to 10 cm (3.9 in) long and 4 cm (1.6 in) in diameter. Ribs 14-16, low, finely tuberculate. Central spines 4, reddish brown, erect or divergent, to 30 mm (1.2 in) long. Radial spines 18-21, bristle-like, white, 5-10 mm (0.2-0.4 in) long. Flowers borne near the stem tips, narrow funnelform, pink, 3-6.2 cm (1.22.4 in) long, 4-7.2 cm (1.6-2.8 in) in diameter. Fruits round, brownish green, with wool and thin brown spines. Distribution: oak woodland on the western side of the Sierra Madre Occidental in eastern Sonora, Mexico.

Echinocereus ledingii Peebles 1936 leding's hedgehog cactus

Plants forming clumps of 4-10 stems with spines obscuring the stems. Stems ovoid to cylindrical, sometimes, becoming elongate, green, 2.5-5 cm (1-2 in) long, 6-7.5 cm (2.4-3 in) in diameter. Ribs 12-14, not tuberculate. Central spines 1-4, the main one strongly curved downward, stout, yellowish, becoming blackish, round, 2-2.5 cm (0.8-1 in) long. Radial spines 9-11, spreading, yellowish, 1.2-1.5 cm (0.5-0.6 in) long. Flowers borne near the stem tips or along the sides, broadly funnelform, magenta to rose purple, 5-6 cm (2-2.4 in) long and in diameter. Fruits globose, green, becoming red, fleshy, edible. Distribution: southeastern Arizona.

Echinocereus leucanthus N. P. Taylor 1985 Wilcoxia albiflora Backeberg 1952

Plants usually branched near their bases, supported by neighboring vegetation. Roots large, tuberous. Stems cylindrical, tapering basally, light to dark green, very slender, to 30 cm (12 in) high, 0.3-0.6 cm (to 0.2 in) in diameter. Ribs 8,

Echinocereus laui
Echinocereus Leucanthus

Echinocereus leucanthus, photograph by Jean-Marie Solichon

Sinaloa Echinocereus

Echinocereus leucanthus, photograph by Jean-Marie Solichon

Echinocereus knippelianus very low. Central spines 2-3, sometimes more, blackish, less than 1 mm long. Radial spines 9-18, white, 1 mm long. Flowers borne terminally or near the stem tips, funnelform, white, 2-4 cm (0.8-1.6 in) long, to 4 cm (1.6 in) in diameter. Fruits ovoid, olive green, sweet smelling. Distribution: low elevations in Sonora and Sinaloa, Mexico.

Echinocereus longisetus (Engelmann) Lemaire 1868 Cereus longisetus Engelmann 1856

Cephalocereus delaetii Gürke 1909, Echinocereus delaetii (Gürke) Giirke 1909, E. longisetus var. delaetii (Gürke) N. P. Taylor 1988, E. longisetus subsp. delaetii (Gürke) N. P. Taylor 1997

Plants branching basally forming large clumps to 1 m (3.3 ft) wide. Stems more or less erect, cylindrical, 30-50 cm (1220 in) long, 5-8 cm (2-3.1 in) in diameter. Ribs 11-24, low, tuberculate. Central spines 4-9, whitish to brownish, bristle- to hairlike, straight or curled, directed downward, 1-10 cm (0.4-3.9 in) long. Radial spines 15-20, white, 1-2 cm (0.4-0.8 in) long. Flowers not borne near the stem tips and sometimes nearly basal, funnelform, pinkish purple, 5-7 cm (2-2.8 in) long, 6-7 cm (2.4-2.8 in) in diameter. Fruits poorly known. Distribution: Coahuila and Nuevo León, Mexico.

Two subspecies of Echinocereus longisetus are recognized. Subspecies longisetus typically has stems less than 8 cm (3.1 in) in diameter, 17 or fewer ribs, and straight central spines; it occurs in northern central Coahuila and western central Nuevo León. Subspecies delaetiihzs stems to 8 cm (3.1 in) in diameter, 17-24 ribs, and central spines that are hairlike and often curled; it occurs in southern Coahuila above 1800 m (5900 ft).

Echinocereus mapimiensis

Echinocereus mapimiensis E. F. Anderson, W. Hodgson & P. Quirk 1998

Plants commonly forming loose clusters, branching basally, to 25 cm (9.8 in) wide, not obscured by spines. Stems cylindrical, soft, blue-green, mostly erect but sometimes drooping with age, 4-30 cm (1.6-12 in) high, 1.5-3.5 cm (0.6-1.4 in) in diameter. Ribs usually 6, obtuse, forming low tubercles. Areoles round, white. Spines not readily differentiated as centrals and radials, straight, needle-like, blackish or deep red, becoming gray or whitish with age. Central spines 2-4, diverging, 15-22 mm (0.6-0.9 in) long. Radial spines 4-8, diverging, 9-18 mm (0.4-0.7 in) long. Flowers funnelform, brownish magenta with cream margins, 3-4.5 cm (1.1-1.8 in) long, 1.7-4 cm (0.7-1.6 in) in diameter. Fruits globose to ovoid, green, 15-21 mm (0.6-0.8 in) long, 12-15 mm (0.5- 0.6 in) in diameter. Distribution: Bolson de Mapimi, Coahuila, Mexico.

Echinocereus maritimus (M. E. Jones) K. Schumann 1897 Cereus maritimus M. E. Jones 1883

Echinocereus hancockii E. Y. Dawson 1949, E. maritimus var. hancockii (E. Y. Dawson) N. P. Taylor 1985, E. maritimus subsp. hancockii (E. Y. Dawson) Blum & Lange 1998

Plants much branched, forming clumps to 40 cm (16 in) high and 2 m (6.6 ft) wide with as many as 300 stems. Stems cylindrical, light to dark green, 5-30 cm (2-12 in) high, 3-7 cm (1.2-2.8 in) in diameter. Ribs 8-10, acute. Spines bright red, becoming dirty yellow or gray. Central or upper spines 7-10, strongly flattened and angled, erect, 3-6 cm (1.2-2.4 in) long. Radial or lower spines 7-10,1.5-2.5 cm (0.6-1 in)

Echinocereus maritimus subsp. maritimus long. Flowers arising below the stem tips, funnelform, bright yellow, to 6 cm (2.4 in) long and in diameter. Fruits globose, green, becoming red, spiny. Distribution: western coast of Baja California, Mexico, and adjacent islands.

Some recognize two subspecies of Echinocereus maritimus. Subspecies hancockii is much larger than subspecies maritimus, has stems 5.5-7 cm (2.2-2.8 in) in diameter, and occurs in smaller clumps with as many as 30 stems.

Echinocereus mojavensis (Engelmann & Bigelow) Rumpler 1886 mojave hedgehog

Cereus mojavensis Engelmann & Bigelow 1856, E. trigiochidianus var. mojavensis (Engelmann & Bigelow) L. D. Benson 1944, E. coccineus subsp. mojavensis (Engelmann & Bigelow) N. P. Taylor 1997, E. trigiochidianus subsp. mojavensis (Engelmann & Bigelow) Blum & Lange 1998

Plants commonly forming mounds or large clumps with as many as 500 stems. Stems globose to oblong, pale green, 520 cm (2-7.9 in) long, to 5 cm (2 in) in diameter. Ribs 8-13, somewhat wavy, sometimes becoming indistinct. Areoles round, white. Spines white, becoming gray with age. Central spine one, 3-5 cm (1.2-2 in) long. Radial spines 5-9, often curving and twisting, spreading, 1-2.5 cm (0.4-1 in) long. Flowers carmine red, to 7 cm (2.8 in) long. Fruits oblong, 2.5-3 cm (1-1.2 in) long. Distribution: California, southern Nevada, southwestern Utah, northwestern Arizona, and northeastern Baja California, Mexico.

Echinocereus mojavensis

Echinocereus nicholii (L. D. Benson) B. D. Parfitt 1987

golden hedgehog, nichol's hedgehog cactus Echinocereus engelmannii var. nicholii L. D. Benson 1944 Echinocereus nicholii subsp. llanuraensis Rutow 1995

Plants branching basally, forming large, loose clumps of as many as 30 stems. Stems cylindrical, erect, 30-60 cm (12-24 in) high, 5-7.5 cm (2-3 in) in diameter. Ribs 10-13, not clearly tuberculate. Spines markedly long, glassy white or clear, golden yellow. Central spines 2-6, straight, rigid, lower one 5-6.2 cm (2-2.4 in) long. Radial spines 6-12, diverging, straight, 0.8-1.2 cm (0.3-0.5 in) long. Flowers borne on the upper half of the stems, funnelform, pale lavender, 5-6.2 cm (2-2.4 in) long and in diameter. Fruits ovoid, green, becoming red, with deciduous spines. Distribution: Arizona and neighboring Sonora, Mexico.

Two subspecies of Echinocereus nicholii are recognized. Subspecies nicholii has 4-8 central spines and 8-12 radials, pink flowers, and dehiscent fruits; it occurs in southern Arizona and northern Sonora at elevations of 300-900 m (9802950 ft). Subspecies llanuraensis has 6-11 central spines and 15-18 radials, crimson flowers, and indehiscent fruits; it occurs only near Guaymas, Sonora.

Echinocereus nivosus Glass 8c R. Foster 1978 Echinocereus albatus Backeberg 1960, not validly published

Plants freely branching to form compact mounds to 12 cm (4.7 in) high and 30 cm (12 in) wide. Stems ovoid to short cylindrical, light green, to 4 cm (1.6 in) in diameter, almost obscured by spines. Ribs 10-15, somewhat tuberculate. Spines mostly glassy white, slender. Central spines 10-15, to 20 mm (0.8 in) long. Radial spines 25-40, radiating, 4-9 mm (to 0.4 in) long. Flowers borne at the stem tips, slender funnelform, deep pink to deep magenta, to 6 cm (2.4 in) long, 4-5 cm (1.6-2 in) in diameter. Fruits subglobose, reddish lavender, spiny. Distribution: a small area of southeastern Coahuila, Mexico at an elevation of 2000 m (6600 ft).

Echinocereus ortegae Rose ex J. G. Ortega 1929 Echinocereus scheeri var. koehresianus G. Frank 1988, E. ortegae subsp. koehresianus (G. Frank) W. Rischer & G. Frank 1996

Plants forming dense clusters of many stems, to 30 cm (12 in) wide. Stems cylindrical, usually erect, dark green, 10-40 cm (3.9-16 in) high, 2.5-4 cm (1-1.6 in) in diameter. Ribs 10-16, tuberculate. Spines needle-like or bristly, whitish to brownish. Central spines 3-6, 9-22 mm (0.4-0.9 in) long. Radial spines 10-15, to 8 mm (0.3 in) long. Flowers borne on the sides of the stems, tubular funnelform, slightly bilaterally symmetrical, brilliant scarlet, 6.5-10 cm (2.6-3.9 in)

long, 4.5-10 cm (1.8-3.9 in) in diameter. Fruits ovoid, green with white pulp, with dehiscent spines. Distribution: Sinaloa and Durango, Mexico.

Continue reading here: Echinocereuspalmeri Britton Rose 1922

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