Key to Speciescontinued

Stems globular or thicker than long or sometimes clavate, never slender. Flowers red.

Flower-tube distinctly enlarged above, its scales distant, large 6. E. multiplex

Flower-tube slender, nearly cylindric, its scales numerous, small 7. E. oxygona

Flowers white.

Inner perianth-segments acuminate. Spines very short or none.

Areoles nearly spineless 8. E. eyriesii

Areoles with several spines, 4 to 7 mm. long 9. E. turbinata

Spines subulate, 10 to 12 mm. long 10. E. tubiflora

Inner perianth-segments not acuminate.

Spines becoming white 11. E. albispinosa

Spines yellow to gray or brown.

Inner perianth-segments obtuse 12. E. silvestrii

Inner perianth-segments acute.

Plant small, 9 cm. in diameter or less; flower 16 cm. long 13. E. calochlora

Plant 4 to 5 dm. high, 3 to 3.5 dm. thick; flower 20 to 22 cm. long 14. E. cordobensis

CC. Spines more or less curved.

Spines very delicate, central one hooked 15. E. ancistrophora

Spines stout.

Central spine solitary. Radial spines straight.

Plant about 9 cm. thick, 3 dm. high or less 16. E. spegaziniana

Plant up to 1.5 meters high, 16 to 18 cm. in diameter 17. E. shaferi

Radial spines curved.

Ribs strongly crenate 18. E. fiebrigii

Ribs not strongly crenate.

Flowers 15 cm. long or less 19. E. rhodotricha

Flowers 20 cm. long or more.

Central spine up to 10 cm. long 20. E. leucantha.

Central spine about 2.5 cm. long 21. E. obrepanda

Central spines several.

Ribs 16; spines at first rose 22. E. intricatissima

Ribs 13 or 14; spines gray to blackish.

Flowers straight 23. E. molesta

Flowers curved 24. E. baldiana

BB. Flowers yellow 25. E. aurea

AA. Tube of perianth not longer than limb.

Ribs not undulate 26. E. bridgesii

Ribs undulate 27. E. mamillosa

AAA. Species not grouped 28. E. formosa

1. Echinopsis meyeri Heese, Gartenflora 56: 1. 1907.

Stems globose or somewhat depressed at apex, 10 cm. in diameter, pale green; ribs 14 to 16, acute, usually straight; spines subulate, all straight, rosy below, brown or black above, but in age nearly white; radial spines 7 or 8; central spine solitary; flowers numerous, lateral, 15 to 20 cm. long; all perianth-segments long, threadlike, twisted, the outer ones brownish, the inner dull white; axils of scales on ovary and flower-tube bearing many long hairs; stigma-lobes cream-colored.

Type locality: Paraguay.

Distribution: Paraguay.

We have not seen specimens of this species, but the type was illustrated; so far as we know it is not in cultivation. This should not be confused with the Echinopsis Meyeri which is grown in gardens and which, according to Berger, is a hybrid between E. eyriesii and E. leucantha.

This plant is remarkable among cacti for its very narrow perianth-segments.

Haage and Schmidt offer a plant under this name for sale. It suckers very freely, both on the side and near the top of the plant and these begin to send out roots while still attached to the parent plant. They are covered with short brown spines. We do not know the origin of Haage and Schmidt's consignment and we have seen only very small plants from it. As these all show several central spines, while the E. meyeri Heese is known to have a single central spine, there may be doubt as to their identification.

Illustration: Gartenflora 56: pl. 1558.

Figure 80 is from a photographic copy of the illustration above cited.

2. Echinopsis mirabilis Spegazzini, Anal. Mus. Nac. Buenos Aires III. 4: 489. 1905.

Simple, cylindric, 12 to 15 cm. high, 2 cm. in diameter, dull yellowish green; ribs 11, slightly undulate; areoles minute; spines all straight; radial spines 9 to 14, slender; central spine solitary, erect, 10 to 15 mm. long; flowers borne near the top of the plant, inodorous, I, to 12 cm. long; inner perianth-segments white, acuminate; scales on ovary and flower-tube very woolly in their axils, thin, scarious at base, almost filiform, 8 mm. long; outer perianth-segments similar to the scales but longer; fruit 3.5 to 4 cm. long, 5 to 6 mm. in diameter; seeds globular, 1.5 mm. in diameter, with a depressed hilum.

Fig. 80.—Echinopsis meyeri. Fig. 81.—Echinopsis mirabilis.

Type locality: Near Colonia Ceres, province of Santiago del Estero. Distribution: Known only from province of Santiago del Estero, Argentina. This plant is called flor de la oración.

Besides photographs of the type Dr. Spegazzini has presented us with a fruit from the type plant.

Figure 81 is from a photograph contributed by Dr. Spegazzini. 3. Echinopsis forbesii (Lehmann) A. Dietrich, Allg. Gartenz. 17: 193. 1849.

Echinocactusforbesii Lehmann in Walpers, Repert. Bot. 2: 319. 1843. Echinopsis valida Monville in Salm-Dyck, Cact. Hort. Dyck. 1849. 181. 1850. Echinopsis valida forbesii R. Meyer in Schumann, Gesamtb. Kakteen 239. 1897.

*Walpers says: F. A. Lehm. in Terscheck, Suppl. Cact. 2." Förster (Handb. Cact. 520. 1846) used Echinopsis forbesii Hort. Angl. as a synonym of Echinocactus forbesii, but hardly publishes it.

Usually simple, columnar, claviform, sometimes 1 meter high, 20 cm. in diameter, glaucous-green; ribs 10 to 15, acute, separated by acute intervals; areoles circular, filled with spines and short white wool; spines 8 to 15, the longest 2 cm. long, acicular, straight, pale, nearly white, except the tips, these brown; central spines 1 to several, the longest 3 to 4 cm. long, stouter than the radials. horizontal; young joints borne near the top of the plant, densely covered with yellow and brown spines intermixed with soft white hairs; flowers borne near the top of the plant, about 10 cm. long; inner perianth-segments spreading, lanceolate, acute, white.

Type locality: Not cited.

Distribution: Paraguay (fide Weber).

This species is known to us only from descriptions and illustrations. Schumann follows Meyer in making E. forbesii a variety of E. valida. We have united the two and taken the older specific name

The species was named for James Forbes (1773-1861), an enthusiastic student of cacti and gardener for the Duke of Bedford at Woburn Abbey.

Cereus validissimus Weber (Dict. Hort. Bois 473. 1896) is given as a synonym of E. valida.

Illustrations: Monatsschr. Kakteenk. 5: 117; Palmer, Cult. Cact. 151; Möllers Deutsche Gart. Zeit. 25: 475. f. 7, No. 17, as Echinopsis valida.

4. Echinopsis huottii (Cels) Labouret, Monogr. Cact. 301. 1853.

Echinocactus huotti Cels, Portef. Hort. 216. 1847.

Echinopsis apiculata Linke, Wochenschr. Gärtn. Pflanz. 1: 85. 1858.

Plants simple, slender, up to 3.5 dm. high, short-columnar, dull green; ribs 9 to 11, crenate; radial spines 9 to 11, acicular, 2 cm. long or more; central spines normally 4, brown, 4 cm. long, subulate, porrect; flowers lateral, large, 17 to 20 cm. long, white; stamens included, greenish below, white above; style green; stigma-lobes 14, green.

Type locality: Cited as Chile (fide Labouret), but doubtless wrongly.

Distribution: Bolivia (fide Linke and Schumann).

It does not seem close to any of the other species. It is quite different from the Bolivian species collected by Dr. Rose at La Paz, Bolivia, which we have referred to E. bridgesii. (See page 74.)

We have studied a plant sent to the New York Botanical Garden from the Berlin Botanical Garden in 1902; in this there is only one central spine at each areole.

Schlumberger (Rev. Hort. IV. 3: 348. 1854) calls this Echinopsis kuottii, doubtless a typographical error.

Cereus huottii Cels and Echinopsis verschaffeltii (Dict. Hort. Bois 471. 1896) are given as synonyms of this species by Weber.

Illustrations: Möllers Deutsche Gärt. Zeit. 25: 475. f. 7, No. 11, as Echinopsis apiculata; Schumann, Gesamtb. Kakteen f. 45; Gartenwelt 17: 145.

5. Echinopsis minuana Spegazzini, Anal. Mus. Nac. Buenos Aires III. 4: 488. 1905.

Simple or rarely proliferous at base, columnar, 5 to 8 dm. high, 14 to 15 cm. in diameter; ribs 12, straight, a little undulate; spines all straight, dark brown to chestnut-colored; radial spines 4 to 7, short, 2 to 3 cm. long; central spine solitary, stouter than the radials, bulbose at base, 5 to 6 cm. long; flowers large, inodorous, 20 cm. long; inner perianth-segments oblanceolate, 4.5 cm. long; filaments and style greenish white; stigma-lobes 17 or 18, greenish white; fruit subglobose, 4.5 cm. long, greenish red.

Type locality: Bank of Paraná River, province of Entre Rios, Argentina.

Distribution: Province of Entre Rios, eastern Argentina.

We know this species only from description and a photograph taken by Dr. Spegazzini.

6. Echinopsis multiplex (Pfeiffer) Zuccarini in Pfeiffer and Otto, Abbild. Beschr. Cact. 1: pl. 4. 1839.

Cereus multiplex Pfeiffer, Enum. Cact. 70. 1837.

Echinonyctanthus multiplex Lemaire, Cact. Gen. Nov. Sp. 85. 1839.

Plants simple or very proliferous, globular to somewhat clavate, rounded at apex, 1.5 dm. high; ribs 13 to 15, broad at base, acute, slightly undulate; areoles large, filled with short white wool; spines brown, subulate; radial spines 5 to 15, ascending, 2 cm. long; central spines 2 to 5, 4 Cm. long; flower 15 to 20 cm. long, its tube distinctly enlarged above, its scales large, distinct; inner perianth-segments broad, rose-colored, acuminate; stamens and style much shorter than perianth-segments, but exserted beyond the throat; stigma-lobes white, slender, 6 or 7.

Type locality: Southern Brazil.

Distribution: Southern Brazil.

This species may not be distinct from the following one. In collections of cacti, plants apparently intermediate in character are frequently found, as well as many hybrids.

Pfeiffer (Enum. Cact. 70. 1837) gives Echinocactus multiplex as a synonym of Cereus multiplex, while the name was in use in the Botanical Garden in Berlin in 1829 (Verh. Ver. Beförd. Gartenb. 6: 431. 1830). On the following page he describes the variety monstrosus. Other forms have been described as var. cossa, picta, and cristata under Echinopsis multiplex.

This plant is common in cultivation. Some of the illustrations cited for this and the two following species may represent hybrid plants with one of these species as one of the parents.

Illustrations: Watson, Cact. Cult. 80. f. 25; Dict. Gard. Nicholson 4: 512. f. 11, as Cereus multiplex cristatus; Dict. Gard. Nicholson Suppl. f. 365; Förster, Handb. Cact. ed. 2. f. 9; Grässner, Haupt-Verz. Kakteen 1912: 16; Gard. Chron. III. 29: f. 80; Schelle, Handb. Kakteenk. f. 48; Möllers Deutsche Gärt. Zeit. 25: 475. f. 7, No. 12, as Echinopsis multiplex cristata; Dict. Gard. Nicholson 4: 512. f. 10; Curtis's Bot. Mag. 66: pl. 3789; Watson, Cact. Cult. 7. f. 24, as Cereus multiplex; Monatsschr. Kakteenk. 16: 89, as Echinopsis multiplex monstrosa; Monatsschr. Kakteenk. 6: 10; Pfeiffer and Otto, Abbild. Beschr. Cact. 1: pl. 4; Förster, Handb. Cact. ed. 2. 139. f. 8; Dict. Gard. Nicholson Suppl. f. 364; Rümpler, Sukkulenten 168. f. 92; Garden 84: 133; Möllers Deutsche Gärt. Zeit. 25: 475. f. 7, No. 6.

Plate vi, figure 2, shows a flowering plant in the collection of the New York Botanical Garden, received from the Missouri Botanical Garden.

7. Echinopsis oxygona (Link) Zuccarini in Pfeiffer and Otto, Abbild. Beschr. Cact. 1: under pl. 4.

i839.

Echinocactus oxygonus Link in Link and Otto, Verh. Ver. Beförd. Gartenb. 6: 419. 1330.

Cereus oxygonus Pfeiffer, Enum. Cact. 70. 1837.

Echinocactus octogonus G. Don in Sweet, Hort. Brit. ed. 3. 283. 1839.

Echinonyctanthus oxygonus Lemaire, Cact. Gen. Nov. Sp. 8. 1839.

Plants subglobose, simple or somewhat clustered, about 25 cm. in diameter, somewhat glaucous; ribs 14, broad at base, rounded on back; spines about 14, short and stout, 2 to 4. cm. long; flowers usually from areoles halfway up the side of the plant, sometimes nearly dm. long, the tube slender, nearly cylindric, its scales numerous and small; inner perianth-segments pale red, acute or acuminate.

Type locality: Southern Brazil.

Distribution: Southern Brazil, Uruguay, and northeastern Argentina.

Pfeiffer (Enum. Cact. 70. 1837) and also Steudel referred Echinocactus sulcatus as a synonym of this species. E. sulcatus Link and Otto (Steudel, Nom. ed. 2. 1: 537. 1840) is supposed to be different from the last, but in any case it is only a name.

Echinopsis sulcata occurs as a name in a paper by Werckle (Monatsschr. Kakteenk. 15: 180. 1905).

Echinopsis wilkensii (E. eyriesii wilkensii Linke), E. rohlandii, and E. lagemannii Dietrich (E. eyriesii lagemannii Dietrich) are all mentioned by Schumann (Gesamtb. Kakteen 235. 1897) as hybrids of which E. oxygona is one of the parents. Schelle (Handb.

BRITTON AND ROSE, VOL. III PLATE VI

BRITTON AND ROSE, VOL. III PLATE VI

1. Top of flowering plant of Echinopsis turbinata.

2. Flowering plant of Echinopsis multiplex.

(All natural size.)

Kakteenk. 112. 1907) lists the following as hybrids with this species and E. eyriesii: E. triumphans, E. nigerrima, and E. undulata. Echinopsis roehlandii is figured in the Revue Horticole (85: pl. Opp. 304).

Two varieties, inermis and subinermis, are sometimes given under this species. E. oxygona turbinata Mittler (Labouret, Monogr. Cact. 306. 1853) is considered a hybrid.

Illustrations: Möllers Deutsche Gärt. Zeit. 16: 80; 25: 475. f. 7, No. 3, as Echinopsis lagemannii; Curtis's Bot. Mag. 71: pl. 4162; Edwards's Bot. Reg. 20: pl. 1717; Verh. Ver. Beförd. Gartenb. 6: pl. 1, as Echinocactus oxygonus; Schelle, Handb. Kakteenk. 114. f. 49; Cact. Journ. 1: pl. 6; Pfeiffer, Abbild. Beschr. Cact. 2: pl. 4; Möllers Deutsche Gärt. Zeit. 25: 475. f. 7, No. 2; Gartenwelt 1: 283.

Figure 82 is from a photograph, contributed by Dr. Spegazzini.

Fig. 82.—Echinopsis oxygona. Fig. 83.—Echinopsis tubiflora.

8. Echinopsis eyriesii (Turpin) Zuccarini in Pfeiffer and Otto, Abbild. Beschr. Cact. 1: under pl. 4. 1839.

Echinocactus eyriesii Turpin,* Ann. Inst. Roy. Hort. Fromont 2: 158. 1830.

Cereus eyriesii Pfeiffer, Enum. Cact. 72. 1837.

Echinonyctanthus eyriesii Lemaire, Cact. Gen. Nov. Sp. 84. 1839.

Echinopsispudantii Pfersdorff, Monatsschr. Kakteenk. 10: 167. 1900.

Simple or clustered, globular to short-columnar; ribs 11 to 18, not tuberculate, rather thin above; areoles circular, filled with white or tawny wool; spines several, 14 to 18, very short, 5 mm. long or less; flower from the side of plant but above the middle, large, 17 to 25 cm. long; inner perianth-segments white, acuminate; stamens and style shorter than the perianth-segments; scales on the flower-tube small, ovate, brownish, hairy in their axils.

Type locality: Buenos Aires, according to Pfeiffer.

Distribution: Southern Brazil, Uruguay, and province of Entre Rios, Argentina.

The following varieties have been published, some well-known hybrids, others mere forms; var. cristata (Monatsschr. Kakteenk. 2: 27. 1902); vars. glauca and glaucescens (Förster, Handb. Cact. 360. 1846); vars. tettavii and triumphans Jacobi (Förster, Handb. Cact. ed. 2. 626, 630. 1885), sometimes given as Echinopsis triumphans (Monatsschr. Kakteenk. 15: 33. 1905) and var. grandiflora R. Meyer (Monatsschr. Kakteenk. 21: 186. 1911). Schelle (Handb. Kakteenk. 111, 112. 1907) gives the following varieties besides two quadrinomials: major, rosea Link, cristata, phyligera, and duvallii.

* The reference for this species is usually cited as "Obs. Cact. 5 8," referring to a paper by Turpin entitled "Observations sur la Famille des Cactées, etc." in three parts which appeared in the above cited volume.

Echinopsis eyriesii inermis is in the trade (Grässner).

In cultivation this plant buds freely, sometimes producing at the same time a dozen or more small spiny buds which, dropping to the ground, start new plants. These appear only at the areoles, sometimes at the top and sometimes near the bottom of the old plant. This species has long been a favorite with gardeners.

This species was named for Alexander Eyries of Havre, France.

Illustrations: Edwards's Bot. Reg. 20: pl. 1707; Curtis's Bot. Mag. 62: pl. 3411; Loudon, Encycl. Pl. ed. 2 and 3. 1201. f. 17353; Ann. Inst. Roy. Hort. Fromont 2: pl. 2, as Echinocactus eyriesii; Edwards's Bot. Reg. 24: pl. 31, as Echinocactus eyriesii glaucus; Monatsschr. Kakteenk. 10: 166; Schumann, Gesamtb. Kakteen Nachtr. f. 10, as Echinopsis pudantii; Deutsches Mag. Gart. Blumen. 1855: 112, as Echinopsis tettavii; Förster, Handb. Cact. ed. 2. 627. f. 83, as Echinopsis eyriesii tettavii; Förster, Handb. Cact. ed. 2. f. 84; Rümpler, Sukkulenten 171. f. 94, as Echinopsis eyriesii triumphans; Dict. Gard. Nicholson 4: 541. f. 26; Suppl. 337. f. 363, as Echinopsis eyriesii flore-pleno; Schelle, Handb. Kakteenk. f. 46; Möllers Deutsche Gärt. Zeit. 25: 475. f. 7, No. 4; Garten-Zeitung 4: 182. f. 42, No. 12; Anal. Mus. Nac. Montevideo 5: pl. 27; Blühende Kakteen 2: pl. 72; Engler and Prantl, Pflanzenfam. 36a: f. 59, C; Förster, Handb. Cact. ed. 2. f. 82; Gartenflora 28: 3; Schumann, Gesamtb. Kakteen f. 10; Martius, Fl. Bras. 42: pl. 47; Rümpler, Sukkulenten f. 93; Cact. Journ. 1: pl. 6; 2: 7.

9. Echinopsis turbinata Zuccarini in Pfeiffer and Otto, Abbild. Beschr. Cact. 1: under pl. 4. 1839.

Cereus turbinatus Pfeiffer, Allg. Gartenz. 3: 314. 1835.

Echinonyctanthus turbinatus Lemaire, Cact. Gen. Nov. Sp. 84. 1839.

Echinonyctanthus turbinatuspictus Monville in Lemaire, Cact. Gen. Nov. Sp. 84. 1839.

Echinopsis gemmata Schumann in Martins, Fl. Bras. 42: 231. 1890.

Simple or somewhat clustered, globose; ribs 13 or 14, broad at base, hardly undulate; spines several, 7 mm. long or less; flowers appearing from upper areoles, about 15 cm. long, with a strong odor of jasmine and citron; inner perianth-segments white, acuminate; stamens and style shorter than the perianth-segments, but projecting beyond the throat; scales on tube and ovary small, woolly in their axils.

Type locality: Not cited.

Distribution: Province of Entre Rios, Argentina.

Cereus jasmineus and Echinocactus turbinatus (Pfeiffer, Enum. Cact. 72. 1837), as synonyms for Cereus turbinatus, doubtless belong here.

Echinocactus gemmatus Link and Otto (Verh. Ver. Beförd. Gartenb. 6: 431. 1830), only a name, is doubtless to be referred here, while Cereus gemmatus Otto (Allg. Gartenz. 3: 314. 1835, not Verh. Ver. Beförd. Gartenb. 6: 431. 1830, as cited by Schumann) was published as a synonym of Cereus turbinatus. For this reason we have substituted Echinopsis turbinata for E. gemmata, the name generally used for this plant.

Walpers refers to the following as an undescribed species: Echinopsis picta Walpers (Rep-ert. Bot. 2: 324. 1843; Echinonyctanthus pictus Lemaire, Cact. Gen. Nov. Sp. 84. 1839, fide Walpers, but in error), as synonym. This probably belongs here also. Echinopsis turbinata picta (Walpers, Repert. Bot. 2: 275. 1843) is only a listed name.

Of this relationship are the following: Echinopsis schelhasii Pfeiffer and Otto (Abbild. Beschr. Cact. 1: under pl. 4. 1839; Echinonyctanthus schelhasii Lemaire, Cact. Gen. Nov. Sp. 84. 1839*), Cereus schelhasii Pfeiffer (Allg. Gartenz. 3: 314. 1835), Echinopsis schelhasei rosea Rümpler (Förster, Handb. Cact. ed. 2. 623. 1885), Echinopsis gemmata schelhasei (Schelle, Handb. Kakteenk. 113. 1907), Echinopsis decaisneana Walpers (Repert. Bot. 2: 324. 1843; Echinonyctanthus decaisnianus Lemaire, Cact. Gen. Nov. Sp. 55. 1839; Echinocactus decaisnei Steudel, Nom. ed. 2. 1: 536. 1840; Echinopsis gemmata decaisneana Schelle, Handb. Kakteenk. 113, 1907), Echinopsis jamessiana (Salm-Dyck, Cact. Hort. Dyck. 1849. 38. 1850 and Echinopsis falcata Rümpler (Förster Handb. Cact. ed. 2 622. 1885).

*According to Walpers, but in error.

Echinopsis decaisneana is a delicately fragrant, beautiful pink form with large flowers; the inner perianth-segments are oblong, acute or acuminate. It is a hybrid between this and some other species. The flowers open during the day and last usually for more than one day.

Illustrations: Cact. Journ. 1: 59; 2 169, as Cereus gemmatus; Möllers Deutsche Gärt. Zeit. 25: 475. f. 7. No. 14, as Echinopsis gemmata cristata; Cycl. Amer. Hort. Bailey 2: f. 749; Stand. Cycl. Hort. Bailey 2: f. 1377; Möllers Deutsche Gärt. Zeit. 25: 475. f. 7, No. 23; Tribune Hort. 4: pl. 139; Gartenwelt 7: 289; U. S. Dept. Agr. Bur. Pl. Ind. Bull. 262: pl. 10, as Echinopsis gemmata; Dict. Gard. Nicholson 1: 502. f. 697; Förster, Handb. Cact. ed. 2. 621. f. 81, as Echinopsis decaisneana; Pfeiffer, Abbild. Beschr. Cact. 2: pl. 7.

Plate vi, figure 1, shows a plant in the collection of the New York Botanical Garden.

10. Echinopsis tubiflora (Pfeiffer) Zuccarini in A. Dietrich, Allg. Gartenz. 14: 306. 1846.

Simple or clustered, subglobose, about 12 cm. in diameter; ribs about 12, prominent, slightly undulate; areoles circular, filled with white wool; spines subulate, black, 10 to 12 mm. long; flowers from the side of the plant, 1,5 to 20 cm. long; inner perianth-segments spreading, white, acuminate; filaments and style projecting a little beyond the throat; axils of scales on flower-tube bearing long wool.

Type locality: Not cited.

Distribution: Provinces of Tucuman, Catamarca, and Salta, Argentina; recorded from

Pfeiffer (Enum. Cact. 71. 1837) gives Echinocactus tubiflorus as a synonym of Cereus tubiflorus.

Salm-Dyck (Cact. Hort. Dyck. 1849. 39. 1850) gives Echinopsis zuccariniana Pfeiffer instead of E. zuccarinii and Rümpler uses this spelling. Under E. zuccariniana several floral and abnormal forms have been described as varieties, among which are rosea, cristata, monstrosa, picta, rohlandii, and nigrispina and under E. zuccarinii, monstruosa, nigrispina, and picta; some of the same varieties appear under E. tubiflora including nigrispina, rosea, and rohlandii. Walpers (Repert. Bot. 2: 324. 1843) credits the name Echinonyctanthus nigrispinus to Lemaire, but Lemaire used the name nigrispinus only as a variety of E. tubiflorus.

Echinopsis droegeana Berger (Monatsschr. Kakteenk. 1: 24. 1891) is probably a hybrid with this species as one of the parents.

Echinopsis zuccarinii robusta is in the trade (Grässner).

Illustrations: Hartinger, Parad. 1: 8, as Cereus tubiflorus; Curtis's Bot. Mag. 65: pl. 3627, as Echinocactus tubiflorus; Möllers Deutsche Gärt. Zeit. 16: 80, as Echinopsis tubiflora hybrid; Monatsschr. Kakteenk. 4: 27, as E. zuccariniana rohlandii; Belg. Hort. 16: pl. Opp. 130, as Echinopsis zuccariniana; Schelle, Handb. Kakteenk. f. 50; Floralia 42: 372.

Figure 83 is from a photograph contributed by Dr. Spegazzini.

11. Echinopsis albispinosa Schumann, Monatsschr. Kakteenk. 13: 154. 1903.

Low, simple or somewhat cespitose, almost globular; ribs 10 or 11, slightly undulating; spines 11 to 14, at first reddish brown, becoming white, somewhat ascending; flowers white, 19.5 cm. long, as long or longer than the plant itself; scales on flower-tube and ovary bearing cobwebby hairs in their axils.

Cereus tubiflorus Pfeiffer, Enum. Cact. 71. 1837.

Echinopsis zuccarinii Pfeiffer in Pfeiffer and Otto, Abbild. Beschr. Cact. 1: under pl. 4. 1839. Echinocactus tubiflorus Hooker in Curtis's Bot. Mag. 65: pl. 3627. 1839.

1839.

Echinopsis melanacantha Dietrich, Allg. Gartenz. 14: 306. 1846. Echinopsis grandiflora Linke, Allg. Gartenz. 25: 239. 1857.

Echinopsis tubifloraparaguayensis H. Meyer, Monatsschr. Kakteenk. 23: 153. 1913.

Brazil.

Type locality: Not cited.

Distribution: Supposed to have come from Bolivia or Paraguay, probably from the lat-

We have seen no specimens of this species, but the first illustration cited below is of the type specimen.

Illustrations: Monatsschr. Kakteenk. 13: 155; Möllers Deutsche Gärt. Zeit. 25: 475. f. 7, No. 22.

12. Echinopsis silvestrii Spegazzini, Anal. Mus. Nac. Buenos Aires III. 4: 486. 1905.

Stems simple or somewhat clustered, 5 to 10 cm. high, 4 to 8 cm. in diameter; ribs 12 to 14; spines rather stout and short, grayish; radial spines 5 to 9, appressed; central spine solitary, erect; flowers inodorous, 20 cm. long; inner perianth-segments obtuse, white; style white; stigmalobes 9, white.

Type locality: Mountains between the provinces of Tucuman and Salta, Argentina. Distribution: Northwestern Argentina.

This species was named for Dr. Philip Silvestri, a friend of Dr. Spegazzini. Plate vii, figure 1, shows a plant brought from Salta, Argentina, by Dr. Shafer in 1917 (No. 41) which flowered in the New York Botanical Garden in Tune 1918. Figure I

13. Echinopsis calochlora Schumann, Monatsschr. Kakteenk. 13: 108. 1903.

Plants small, nearly globular, 6 to 9 cm. in diameter, deep green; ribs 13, broad, strongly crenate, separated by narrow intervals; areoles 10 to 15 cm. long, sunken in the ribs; radial spines acicular, yellow, 10 to 14, ascending; central spines 3 or 4, similar to the radials; flowers lateral, appearing above the middle of the plant, 16 cm. long; the tube only a little broader at top than at base, greenish yellow; inner perianth-segments broad, acute, white; stamens exserted beyond the tube; stigma-lobes green.

Fig. 84.—Echinopsis silvestrii.

Fig. 85.—Echinopsis calochlora.

BRITTON AND ROSE, VOL. III

PLATE VII

BRITTON AND ROSE, VOL. III

PLATE VII

1. Top of flowering plant of Echinopsis silvestrii. 2. Top of flowering plant of Echinopsis leucantha.

(All natural size.)

Type locality: Corumba, Brazil. Distribution: Province of Goyaz, Brazil.

Illustrations: Blühende Kakteen 2: pl. 61; U. S. Dept. Agr. Bur. Pl. Ind. Bull. 262: pl. 3; Schelle, Handb. Kakteenk. f. 52.

Figure 85 is copied from the first illustration above cited.

14. Echinopsis cordobensis Spegazzini, Anal. Mus. Nac. Buenos Aires III. 4: 489. 1905.

Plants simple, large, 4 to 5 dm. high, 3 to 3.5 dm. thick, ellipsoid, dull green, somewhat glaucous; ribs 13, straight, acute, stout, not crenate; spines all straight, at first dark, then gray; radial spines 8 to 10, 10 to 20 mm. long; central spines 1 to 3, the lower one largest, 3 to 5 cm. long, bulbose at base; flowers erect, with little or no odor, 20 to 22 cm. long; axils of scales on ovary and flower-tube villous; inner perianth-segments white, acute; fruit globose, 2.5 cm. long, yellowish red.

Type locality: Near Villa Mercedes, province of Córdoba, Argentina.

Distribution: Rare in province of Córdoba, Argentina.

15. Echinopsis ancistrophora Spegazzini, Anal. Mus. Nac. Buenos

Stem simple, subglobose, to 8 cm. in diameter, shining greens ribs 15 or 16, stout, 1 cm. high, broad at base, somewhat crenate; radial spines 3 to 7, slender, spreading backward, 5 to 15 mm. long; central spine solitary, more or less curved or hooked, 1 to 2 cm. long; flowers inodorous, 12 to 16 cm. long; outer perianth-segments green, linear, acuminate; inner perianth-segments white, oblong, acute; fruit ellipsoid, 1.6 cm. long, 8 mm. in diameter; scales on ovary and flower-tube small, their axils lanate.

Type locality: Between Tucuman and Salta, Argentina. Distribution: The high mountains between the provinces of Tucuman and Salta, Argentina.

We have not seen specimens of this species, which Spegazzini says is rare.

Figure 86 is from a photograph contributed by Dr. Spegazzini.

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