Hylocereus antiguensis sp nov

Stems high-clambering, forming great masses in the crotches of high trees or covering the tops of low trees; joints 2 to 4 cm. thick, 3-angled, rarely 4-angled; margins of ribs not horny, hardly undulate; areoles 2.5 to 3.5 cm. apart; principal spines 2 to 4, about 6 mm. long or less, accessory ones or bristles 2 to 5; flowers 14 cm. long; outer perianth-segments linear; inner perianth-segments yellow, at least drying so, broader than the outer segments; flower-tube bearing linear acute scales.

This species is nearest H. trigonus, but the margins of the ribs are very different. The description is based on specimens collected by Dr. Rose in Antigua (No. 3297), of which we have both living and herbarium specimens. It flowered in the New York Botanical Garden in 1916.

Figure 270 is from a photograph taken by Paul G. Russell on Antigua in 1913.

17. Hylocereus calcaratus (Weber) Britton and Rose, Contr. U. S. Nat. Herb. 12: 428. 1909.

Cereus calcaratus Weber, Bull. Mus. Hist. Nat. Paris 8: 458. 1902.

A climbing vine, the joints 4 to 6 cm. wide, strongly 3-winged, green, the margin divided into numerous prominent lobes; areoles small, from the upper angles of the marginal lobes, spineless but bearing 2 to 4 small, white bristles.

Type locality: Port Limon, Costa Rica.

Distribution: Costa Rica.

Neither flowers nor fruit were known to Dr. Weber when he described the plant; we have had it for a number of years and it has not yet flowered with us. It is very unlike the other species of Hylocereus, having very peculiar stems and no spines, and it may not be of this genus.

Figure 271 shows a joint of a plant, which was obtained by W. R. Maxon, in cultivation at San José, Costa Rica, in 1906.

Hylocereus Sp.

Dr. J. A. Samuels collected a species of this genus in the forest plantation, La Poule, Surinam, April 24, 1916 (No. 305), which is the first record we have of this genus being found in Dutch Guiana. Dr. Samuels's plants are juvenile ones, at least in part, as the spines on some specimens are represented by 10 to 12 spiny bristles at each areole; other branches which are more mature are less than 2 cm. broad, 3-angled, with the areoles only 1 to 1.5 cm. apart; the margin of the rib is almost straight; spines 3 to 5, brown, 2 to 3 mm. long. The specimens are without flowers or fruit. While reading the last proof, specimens have been received from Gerold Stahel, of Paramaribo, Surinam, which lead us to believe that the plant from that country is Hylocereus lemairei. Here probably belongs the plant from Surinam which Linnaeus called Cactus triangularis (Amoen. Acad. 8: 257. 1785).

Fig. 270.—Hylocereus antiguensis. calcaratus. X0.5

Hylocereus Sp.

A species, apparently. of this genus. It is a long, clambering plant running over and through tops of shrubs and trees and sometimes killing them, with strongly 3-angled joints, the margins of the ribs rather thick, hardly undulate; the areoles to 6 cm. apart, with 6 to 8 subulate spines, the longer 12 to 15 cm. long. It was collected by E. A. Goldman at Carrizal, Vera Cruz, May 25, 1901 (No. 697) . Its flowers and fruit are unknown.

Fig. 270.—Hylocereus antiguensis. calcaratus. X0.5

Hylocereus Sp.

A species, apparently. of this genus. It is a long, clambering plant running over and through tops of shrubs and trees and sometimes killing them, with strongly 3-angled joints, the margins of the ribs rather thick, hardly undulate; the areoles to 6 cm. apart, with 6 to 8 subulate spines, the longer 12 to 15 cm. long. It was collected by E. A. Goldman at Carrizal, Vera Cruz, May 25, 1901 (No. 697) . Its flowers and fruit are unknown.

Hylocereus Sp.

Branches slender, 3-angled, or sometimes nearly terete, 2 to 3 cm. broad, dull green, sometimes perhaps glaucous; margin not horny; areoles often distant, sometimes 5 cm. apart, borne on prominent and more or less reflexed knobs; spines brown, 2 to 4, stout, conic.

Collected by Dr. Rose near Puerto Cabello, Venezuela, in 1916 (No. 21870).

This very peculiar plant we have not been able to refer definitely to any of the above species. It suggests in a way the other Hylocereus, which Dr. Rose also obtained in Venezuela (No. 2 1835) and which we have described as new in the Appendix. It, however, has not yet flowered in the New York Botanical Garden where it is now being grown.

PUBLISHED SPECIES, PERHAPS OF THIS GENUS, KNOWN TO US ONLY FROM DESCRIPTION. Cereus radicans De Candolle, Prodr. 3: 468. 1828.

This species has not been well understood since its original description. It is probably either a Selenicereus or a Hylocereus. It was described as prostrate, light green in color, 3 or 4-angled, with rigid, slender, brown spines, of which 6 to 9 are radials and 1 is central. De Candolle refers it to Tropical America; Pfeiffer (Enum. Cact. 114), who redescribed it in 1837, refers it to Tropical America and the Antilles. Schumann did not know it, but referred it to South America.

Cereus reptans Salm-Dyck (De Candolle, Prodr. 3: 468. 1828) 5 an unpublished name which was first mentioned under C. radicans, while Cereus reptans Willdenow is referred by De Candolle to Cereus pentagonus.

Ce reus horrens Lemaire, Hort. Univ. 6: 60. 1845.

Climbing and rooting; ribs 3, prominent, strongly tubercled; areoles distant, bearing copious white down; spines 5 to 7, whitish, variable, stout, very long.

This species seems to have been lost. Its flowers and fruit are unknown as is also its origin. It is probably a Hylocereus.

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