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has sometimes been carelessly applied to ail trailing mesem-bryanlhemums. Certainly its one-inch white flowers are not especially striking, but its glistening foliage makes an attractive drapery for a sunny wall or bank, a hanging basket or window box anywhere.

Another familiar group of prostrate mesernbryamhcmums is found in the genus Carpobroius (kahr-po-broh'-tusi which have also become naturalized near the sea in all the warmer regions of the world. The carpobroti are large, trailing perennials with very long stems set with fieshv, triangular. bright green leaves that are often tinged with red. Their flowers are the largest in the family, averaging four or five inches in diameter, and some species bear large edible fruit. Perhaps the commonest of these is C edulis, the Hottentot Fig,--whose four-inch flowers range from yellow to pink. Somewhat similar is the Sea Fig, C chilensis, whose rosy-purple flowers make a vivid splash of color from our Pacific Coast to Chile. And, finally, C. acinaciformist whose five-inch carmine flowers are the largest in the entire Mesembryanthe-mum family. All these species are very quick-growing, rather coarse, and sometimes untidy; but they are unexcelled for holding drifting sand, newly cut banks, or dirl fills in hoi, dry, marginal areas that are seldom watered.

Members of the genus Hymenocycius (hi'-men-oh-sik -lus) are equally valuable as coarse, rank-growing ground covers, bul they provide in addition much more at tractive foliage the year round. The narrow, light y'een leaves form great spreading masses about a foot high covered with rather modest yellow, orange, or bronze flowers. Worthwhile species are H croceus, yellow; H. herrei, yellow orange; and H pur-pureo-croceus, reddish purple centered yellow.

Though they can cover considerable areas when grown in the open, plants in the genus Cephalophyllum (sel ah-loh-fil'-um) are of far more refined habit than any of these. Their long, cylindrical or triangular leaves are clustered in rosettes

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